The Advantages Of New Fibre Laser Welding Techniques

A fuel cell is an electro chemical energy conversion gadget, which produces electrical power from external supplies of fuel (on the anode side) and oxidant (on the cathode side). These respond in the presence of an electrolyte to produce energy.

Considering that a common fuel cell produces less than one volt, in useful application cells are 'stacked' in parallel to develop a beneficial voltage. Hence a common fuel cell is comprised of lots of thin sheets, typically of stainless-steel, which should be bonded together to form the fuel cell stack.

Welding of the plates is without a doubt the most time consuming process associated with the manufacture of fuel cells - there has to do with one meter of welding needed for every single single plate in each fuel cell stack - that has to do with 400m of welding for each eco-car. Optimising the welding process provides the chance making considerable cost savings in the cost of production of fuel cells.

Fibre Laser Welding Techniques
The problems right here are all relevant to the problem of attaining a little, clean, trustworthy weld at feasible production speeds utilizing standard laser welding methods. To fix these issues, the leading-edge producers are now wanting to fiber laser welding innovation.

The essential benefits of fiber lasers over other laser innovations are its high beam energy, quality & power stability, offering greater power density and a higher breadth of control, as well as its low overall cost of ownership. Compared with other laser sources, the fiber laser can produce welds with substantially lower heat input resulting in less distortion of the bonded plates.

It is acknowledged that other laser innovations can making such welds, however the fiber laser provides an option that bonds quicker with greater quality at a lower functional running cost. "We think that the cost-performance ability of a conventional 200W fiber laser will certainly function as an allowing innovation in the fight to drive down production expenses of tomorrows fuel cells" stated John Tinson.

The fuel cell plate needs a high element ratio weld (generally 3:1 or 4:1) in order reduce heat input to the plate and keep distortion to an appropriate level. The charm of the fiber laser is that it easily accomplishes this with area sizes of less than 200 m. As an outcome, distortion of the plates, a possibly advancing issue when the plates are stacked, can be reduced.

Metallographic analysis of 'key-hole' and high element ratio welds commonly exposes issues with weld porosity, specifically in the root of the weld. Experience has actually revealed that the fiber laser, with its incredibly high power density at the work-piece, is specifically excellent producing regularly reputable, non-porous welds.

Another issue kept in mind by some makers making use of YAG or CO2 lasers is the possibility of 'humping' of the weld, when the laser is run at high production speeds. This is the phenomenon wherein the intrinsic fluid instability of the melt swimming pool at high weld speed produces a 'bulge'. It is viewed as an issue by some makers since it can restrict production speed, however it is not an issue with a conventional 200W fiber laser, even at speeds of as much as 5 or 6 metres/ minute it can produce over 2,500 km of weld per year.



In a production environment fiber lasers have a credibility from incredibly high up times and have no functional consumables, unlike other laser sources such as Nd: YAG lasers that need a regular modification of flash lamps or CO2 lasers which require supply of consumable gases. As fiber lasers are sealed systems with no lamps that require altering or mirrors to straighten, they have a really low upkeep overhead, yielding cost savings of thousands of ₤ per year per laser.

Fiber lasers provide fuel cell producers an appealing "green production" innovation, ensuring high performance/ high honesty welding with low operating expense for this important application.

Arise from leading producers in this field reveal that fiber laser welding will certainly play a considerable function in tipping the balance for fuel cell technology from a 'appealing concept' to a major industrial option to the world's energy-usage issues.

The vital benefits of fiber lasers over other laser innovations are its high beam power, energy & quality stability, offering greater power density and a higher breadth of control, as well as its low overall cost of ownership. Compared with other laser sources, the fiber laser can produce welds with substantially lower heat input resulting in less distortion of the bonded plates. Another issue kept in mind by some producers making use of YAG or CO2 lasers is the possibility of 'humping' of the weld, when the laser is run at high production speeds. In a production environment fiber lasers have a track record from very high up times and have no functional consumables, unlike other laser sources such as Nd: YAG lasers that need a routine modification of flash lamps or CO2 lasers which require supply of consumable gases. As fiber lasers are sealed systems with no lamps that require altering or mirrors to straighten, they have an extremely low upkeep overhead, yielding cost savings of thousands of ₤ per year per laser.